Posts

I’m frequently asked the question: If a team wants to maintain stories that are deemed unnecessary, what is the best way to show these in Jira versus having a status of “cancelled”. Recommendation My view is to move issues to a Done status (any status with a Status Category of “Done”) and update the resolution […]

I frequently get asked: What’s the difference between resolved and complete? Why do I have more than one version of “Done”? On my workflows (when I’m running a team) I usually remove the Resolved status. I prefer to make sure the resolution field options are appropriate and use workflow transitions that go to a single […]

The 2018 GDC (Game Developers Conference) was held in San Francisco the week of March 19th. When most people think of gaming, the first things that come to mind are the hottest new games like Fortnite, big-name game development companies such as Blizzard Entertainment, streaming services like Twitch and gaming hardware manufactures like Razer. What […]

Game development is a perfect example of the DevOps model for software lifecycles. When done properly, game development is in a perpetual cycle of building, releasing, supporting and updating. All parts of the development, operations and QA groups must be involved for a game to remain successful. In general, game developers are a creative group, […]

If you count yourself among the nine million people who use Lucidchart, you have probably enjoyed our easy drag-and-drop functionality and compatibility across operating systems when you’re working visually. But that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Check out these tips, selected specifically for software developers, to make sure you’re making the most of all […]

Here’s a hard truth about technical projects: non-trivial projects will accrue technical debt. It doesn’t matter how good your processes are. Over time, technical debt will grow until you are faced with the tough decision of letting the project die or actively reducing the debt.
And, as you make this decision, and diagrams will be your friend.

By definition, agile teams are cross-functional and self-sufficient—they include members capable of taking a project through every step of development, from inception to code release. With a diversity of roles—managers, developers, testers, designers, and ops engineers—working so closely together, timely and effective communication is absolutely essential if agile teams hope to complete their stories on […]