I may be a Consultant, but behind my nicely ironed company polo and sweet Kate Spade laptop bag I’m a serious jira-configuration-ninja-atlassian-fan-nerd. On the daily, I roll up my proverbial sleeves and immerse into the troughs of add-on documentation and administration screens, wading through test environments hodgepodged with remnants of POCs of times passed. I’ve got eight browser windows open, each with at least 10 tabs going and a couple of threads rock’n in a chat room… or four. I’m in it, the focus is real and so is the multi-tasking.

And all for what? My pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is not just paycheck, although that’s super nice too. Its also for the fulfillment, joy and pride that comes from escorting my clients over the bridge from the banks of Atlassian pain, dull aches and bruises, to the glorious banks of Atlassian euphoria… or some derivative thereof. Too dramatic? Meh, I think you get the point.

All that backstory to tell you this: I gotta give some love and say thanks to the folks over at Code Barrel and not for what you might think. Code Barrel was founded in 2016 by two former Atlassians whose current claim to fame is a popular Jira add-on ~ errr, I mean app, errr plugin errr what are we calling them these days? ~ anyhoo, it’s called Automation for Jira. It does exactly what it’s name says, but all with a user friendly interface for unleashing uber-slick Jira auto-magicalness. Personally, I totally dig it… and so do the other 116 people who’ve written an average 4-star review rating on the marketplace.

Side note: I also tried out their lite version. It left much to be desired, but at least I got a good sense for how easy it is to configure and a taste for the rainbow of possibilities that would lead me to my automated-pot-o-gold.

So on to the thank you. It just so happens that during one of my typical tab-happy, jungle of config screens and documentation I was struck, un-expectantly with a proper belly-laugh. It really made my day. It went down like this: My client’s use case calls for an automation rule to run each time a user clicked the “Accept” transition. It would then auto-magically do the following:

  • create an issue in another project
  • dynamically set the values of some of the fields – assignee, component, LOE etc
  • link the transitioned issue to the newly created one
  • post a comment

With me so far? No? Keep going anyway… it gets better. Turns out that this use case is totes supported by the full version of Automation for Jira (not the lite version). Configuring this rule, however, requires the use of what Code Barrel calls “branching a rule”, or working with related issues. As their documentation explains, “Jira issues rarely exist in isolation, but instead have relationships with other issues wether it be in the form of a formal link – linkedissues – or parent/child relationships or in the case of automation the source issue. Branching an automation rule allows you to configure actions to be automatically be carried out on JIRA issues related to the one you started with (the source issue).”

So just as I was about to hit the banks of configuration euphoria and fully understand this branching rules stuff, it happened. Take a gander through the doc. Can you see it? Buried in plain sight, I swear.

I know. I don’t like to read if I don’t have to either. Here’ try this:

 

Now, if you’ve never seen this cult classic, stop what you’re doing right now, make some popcorn, grab your favorite stapler and get to watch’n. You’re in for multiple belly laughs and many more to come because now you’ll get to chime in when your older (wait, am I older now?) co-workers quote like 18 lines from each scene. The quoting is endless and never gets old. You’re welcome.

This kind of laugh is exactly what I need in the middle of a mind-crunching, problem solving, uber-focused moment. So I tip my hat to you Code Barrel. Thanks for the surprise belly-laugh and for making awesome software that solves real problems for my clients. THANK YOU.

When we feel stress our bodies release cortisol. Cortisol impairs rational thinking & decision making. In a toxic culture we are biologically more likely to make a bad decision or do something that is ethically questionable. Healthy corporate cultures matter. ~Simon Sinek

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